Your stay in hospital

You will remain in the ward or several days after the operation.  Don’t be surprised if the nurses get you out of bed quite soon after the operation: walking around is very beneficial to recovery, apparently.

  • You will feel some pain, discomfort, weakness and also feel very tired, but this will improve as the days go on.

  • It is quite common to have bladder spasms after this type of surgery, and to leak a small amount of urine, which may be tinged with blood. These are quite normal; you will be able to get some medication to deal with the bladder spasms before going home. A few days after the operation, paracetamol or ibuprofen should be enough to deal with any remaining discomfort.

  • You may have daily injections to thin the blood while you are in hospital, either injected into the upper arm or the stomach depending on the hospital protocol.

  • You will be provided with elasticated stockings to prevent blood clots forming in the legs.

  • In the days following the operation, a physiotherapist will come to see you to show you breathing and leg exercises to prevent complications.

  • The nurses will flush saline water into the bladder twice a day for the first three days, on the fourth day they will start bladder wash outs and show you how to do this.  If you’ve had part of your bowel used to enlarge your bladder, then it’s very likely that the bowel tissue will continue to create mucus, as it does in the bowel.  This requires regular bladder washouts with water to remove the mucus

  • The Mitrofanoff needs to be treated as a wound. Before you go home the nurse will show you how to take care of it. When you are able to strip wash do not soak it in soap and water. Wash around the area with care, when drying dab dry with a sterile dressing, to prevent infection, and making the site sore.

  • The medical team will do regular blood checks for Vitamin B12, chloride and bicarbonate, especially if you’ve had part of your bowel used to enlarge your bladder.